Finished Texture Piece

I mentioned in my last post that I’d finished my white texture piece that I’ve talked about recentlyHere is the photo from the last post of it all sewn up.  I finally managed to get a bright enough day to take a photograph.  With all of the locks it’s really quite big, so I had to take it outside and photograph it on a large piece of cardboard.  It’s roughly 16 inches x 11 inches, but the locks at the bottom are almost 11 inches long.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI wanted to try something different, so when I laid it out I left a space in the centre without any wool then added a piece of cotton gauze after the second layer of wool.  It was here that I added the wool locks around the edges as well.  I then added another two layers of wool. The surface texture around the edge of the gauze is soybean top, a piece of cotton gauze and silk noil.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn this close-up, you can see a few wisps of wool have crept behind the gauze.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe wool locks all kept their shape really well and none of them tangled together.  The Angora, Wensleydale and Teeswater locks in this next photo show how nicely they turned out.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI kept the whole texture piece soft and spongey by using wools like English 56s, Swaledale, Texel and Cheviot.  For surface texture I used cotton gauze, scoured Bluefaced Leicester and Wensleydale as seen in this photo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI also used Mohair, wool nepps, raw Gotland, Teeswater and Wensleydale locks, and embellishment fibres soybean top and silk noil.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI’m really pleased with the way it turned out, especially the gauze panel in the centre.  Doing this piece has given me some good ideas for future projects.

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13 Responses to Finished Texture Piece

  1. koffipot says:

    Lots of contrasting textures there Zed. The locks look really good. Look forward to seeing what you’re going to do next, especially as I now have lots of scrim and a box of Teeswater locks! Picking your brain. 🙂

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Judith 🙂
      I was just thinking along the lines of more holes, and using locks like Teeswater behind the gauze etc, since it is so long.

  2. Karen says:

    That turned out gorgeously zed ( is that a word lol ) what are your plans to use it, i think it would look lovely in a frame just as it is , nice work 🙂

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Kaz 🙂
      I was thinking of finding some ‘invisible’ way to hang it, maybe nylon thread, so it can hang freely and move.

  3. Love all the different locks and textures. Fabulous!
    I have a non related question regarding water & felting. It has been trotting in my head for a little while now. Anyhow, do you think that using salt water, such as sea water, instead of fresh water would affect the felting process?… Just a thought….

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks Fleur 🙂
      I haven’t thought of how different water affects felting. I’d imagine the salt would get all washed out, but I don’t know if it’d affect the time or make it harder to felt. We don’t have particularly hard water here, I know some places have it very hard, I don’t know if the lime affects felting either. That’s an interesting question!

  4. Lyn says:

    It would look great just mounted as it is in the first photo!

  5. Lovely Zed, The texture is great, I love white on white. It would look nice in a two sided frame and hung in a window.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Ann 🙂
      Me too, you don’t always see the differences in all the white wools until you use them together, do you?

  6. ruthlane says:

    It’s beautiful Zed. I agree with the others, just frame it as is.

  7. Pingback: Wool Supplies and Samples | feltingandfiberstudio

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