Second Quarter Challenge

I know it’s taken me a while, but I finally got around to doing Ann’s 2nd Quarter Challenge! One thing I like more than colourful felt, is lots of colourful felt! So, when I have a nice collection of offcuts, I like to put them together in a collage and make something out of it. I’d been wanting an ‘alternative’ bag to my little drawstring bag for a while now, and I’ve got a canvas satchel which I really like, but I wanted something a little bit smaller, so I thought I’d go with a smaller version of that. I worked out the dimensions for the length and width I’d need it, marked out where the front, back and flap would be, then pieced all my strips together:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe middle section with all the nuno pieces would be the back, I positioned them there because I know from experience that felt, especially Merino felt, can bobble/pill easily when it rubs a lot, like bags do around the hip area. When I trimmed the edges and folded it into shape, I realised the front flap was a bit too long to add satchel straps, so I went with a magnetic closure. This is what it looked like from the front when it was finished:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is how it looks when it’s open:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the back (with the front flap open):

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor the side panels, I tried quite a few felt pieces, One which looked really good was a piece I’d made from woven pencil roving, but I knew it’d be too thick once the hook straps were added, so, and I don’t know why this is still hard to do after all these years, but many will understand, I cut up a piece of nuno felt I made a while ago. I’m not sure I ever showed it because it’s blue and I have a hard time taking photos of blue, but here’s one end of it:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI cut strips for the sides, and thinner strips to make the straps to hold the bag hooks in place:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI got the findings from another bag I bought from a charity shop just for them. I recently bought 10 metres of rainbow webbing with a bag in mind and it went perfectly with this bag, I even got the findings attached the right way around the first time!:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd on the rainbow theme, if there are any Mancs out there, Happy Pride weekend!🙂

Posted in Challenges | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

More, Getting Ready for My Upcoming Show.

My show is coming up fast. It is September 10-11. in Almonte Ontario.  http://mvtm.ca/fibrefest-2016/ I dyed some more silk for scarves. Concentrating on purples.

4 slik scarves 3 silk scarves

I did get 2 scarves finished. The orange one with the yarn on it that I showed you before wetting last time. It needs ironing but I really like how it turned out. The finer yarn shows up much more in person.

orange scarf with yarn

This one has silk top on it and silk throwsters waste but I couldn’t get the throwsters waste to show up in the pictures.

white on white scarf

I also started a hat that will go well with one of the scarves or by it self.

hat getting wet

It’s cut open now and had another roll, then my knees wanted a rest form standing. I will show you the finished hat next time.

Hat ready to felt.

I want to get several more scarves done and a couple of hats and well a ton of other stuff I probably don’t have time to do. Oh well, I wouldn’t want to do anything different this time. LOL

 

Posted in Design, Dyeing, Fairs and Shows, Felted Hats, Nuno Felting, Scarves, Uncategorized, Wet Felting | Tagged , , | 16 Comments

Announcing New Online Class and a Giveaway!

My new online class Print, Stencil and Play with Thickened Dye on Felt is finally ready! It is the third module of Embellishing Felt with Surface Design Techniques – A Mixed Media Approach. The cost for the 4 week course is $45.00 (US). The first offering of the course is September 16, 2016. To register for the course, please fill out the contact us form here.

PSP Front Page

Do you love to experiment and play? This class is going to be a lot of fun as you learn how to make thickened dyes and a variety of ways to apply thickened dye to felt or silk. You’ll learn how to make stamps, stencils and various mark making techniques.

waterlily

For more information about the course, check out the class page here. 

Finished Stenciled Fish on Felt

Now for exciting news! I am giving away one free class slot for this class. To enter to win, share this post on social media such as Facebook, Instagram or your own blog and receive one entry per social media share. Leave a comment below with where you shared the post. You must leave a comment here to be entered to win. The drawing will be held on September 9th and the winner announced here on September 10th. Good Luck!

And remember, our Wet Felting for Beginners online class is always available. So if you’re just starting to felt and want to learn the basics, go here and sign up. 

Posted in Announcements, Online Classes, Surface Design | Tagged , , , | 15 Comments

Little Projects

Thanks a lot to Marilyn for filling in for me the other day when I wasn’t well🙂
It seems like I’ve got a lot of small or half finished projects on the go at the moment. I’ve been collecting glass beads to make a fulling board for the Well Being centre classes. I thought I finally had just enough to do one, so started on that, only to find I ran out of glue!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt still made a nice photo along the surface though:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne thing I did get finished was making some resists for vessels and pods out of the foam I got recently, you can tell which one I used for the bird pod last week:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI took them to the felting/fibre group yesterday and and we ended up with a round bowl, a wide bottomed vase with narrow neck, a bird pod, and a garden den for frogs which inspired the idea to make oven gloves! Here are the other resist shapes:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne thing I did finish a few weeks ago was a rough drop spindle to take to the group:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI cut a little notch in the top:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe only had time for 2 members to have a quick go, but both made nice, even lengths of yarn and picked it up easily. The bits of wood I’ve used so far for making the whorls on my spindles have been some I got off ebay really cheaply, probably because they aren’t very even, so probably wheel rejects. I wanted to make some better spindles, so sent off for some properly made toy wheels:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOf course I couldn’t find the dowelling I bought years ago which I thought would fit perfectly, but after searching everywhere, I found it by accident when I was rearranging the room the other week. I haven’t fixed it properly, but I tried it for size:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI might get around to actually making it in a few more months🙂

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Felting in Florida

My husband I recently went to Florida to visit our son and his family.  I usually try to bring some wool for my grandsons to play with.  We also babysat while our son and daughter-in-law took a weekend away for their anniversary.  It’s always good to keep the boys occupied indoors since it was unbearably hot and humid outside.

This time I thought it would be fun to do pictures.  So, I had them each draw a picture.

Here they are busy creating.  Luke, the six year old, drew dinosaurs.  Josh, the four year old, is into a game or video called Stickman, so Stickmen it was along with an emoji.

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I had brought some white prefelt for the background and colored prefelts for cutouts and a variety of colored roving for them to chose from.

Luke was able to cut most of the big shapes himself, but I helped on the smaller details.  As we worked, we discussed the best way to add each part of the picture. He had very definite ideas.  Since he had done felting before, he was able to do most of the rubbing and rolling himself.

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Josh also had very definite ideas on colors and shapes.  In his picture, we used mostly roving.  The eyes were too hard for him, so I did that.  He’s a very good supervisor giving detailed instructions on what colors and were to put everything.  He started the felting process, then lost interest. So, Grandma had to finish. By the way, those are bananas on the tree.  Evidently, Stickmen like bananas.

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Unfortunately, the vinyl tablecloth I used to protect the wood table began to leach color into the felt even though we used bubble wrap.  So, there are a few pink spots in the corners.  The boys didn’t seem to mind though.

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If they ever get a trampoline, I can see them using Zara’s method to felt a rug.  I know they’d enjoy that!

 

Posted in Wet Felting | Tagged , , , , , | 16 Comments

Nuno Felt Scarves and Some Yarn

I managed to get  couple more scarves done this week. I forgot to get shots of them before I wet them but here they are finished and drying. I lightened them so they are more the colour they will be when they are dry. I had to be fast taking the pictures, the breeze was blowing again and my son had to play interference with the turkeys who were too interested in what I was doing.

scarves

pink close green close

 

I started another with the last of the scarf blanks I dyed. I will have to dye some more. I need to add some purple to the inventory.

orange scarf start

The other thing I did this week was skein my hand spun yarn so I could get it washed. I want to sell it in small skeins for people to use as embellishments in wet felting.

Yarn washed and hanging

Scarves group 4 Scarves group 3 scarves group 2 Scarves group 1

I have to decide how much yarn to put in a small skein. I measured the yarn I put on the green scarf, The scarf starts out just shy of 8 ft. long. I was surprise how much yarn I used; 404 inches/ 33.66 feet/11.2 yards Or 1026.16cm/10.26 metres. So I think maybe 12yds/11meters in a skein. Some will be shorter because there isn’t 12 yard total but the length will be on each label. What do you think? Pricing it is the next problem.

 

Posted in Design, Nuno Felting, Scarves, Spinning, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 14 Comments

Composition and Design – Texture

Texture of Newspaper

On to the next element of design, texture! I think that many of us that create fiber art do so because we love the textures that can be produced with fiber. But there is more to texture than just “wooliness”.

Textures range from the smoothest polished mirror to the roughest mountain range as seen from an airplane. The term is often misused to refer only to rough surfaces but this is not correct. All surfaces have texture. You as a designer recognize that different textures can affect interest in different ways. Some surfaces are inviting and some are repellent and so are the textures that suggest those surfaces. Using different textures can increase interest in a composition by adding variety without changing color or value relationships.

Visual texture refers to the illusion of the surface’s texture. It is what tactile texture looks like (on a 2D surface). The textures you see in a photograph are visual textures. No matter how rough objects in the photograph look, the surface of the photograph is smooth and flat. Most textures have a naturalistic quality; they repeat a motif in a random way. A motif is any recurring thematic element or repeated figure in design. It could be an object, shape, color, direction, etc. With a texture you may be aware of the repeating motif but you are more aware of the surface.

Felted Gotland Locks

Tactile means touch. Tactile texture is the actual (3D) feel of a surface. This is of paramount importance to three-dimensional design but of only moderate interest in two-dimensional design. The actual surface texture needs to either be felt, or seen with light raking across its surface to make the texture visible.

A recognizable motif regularly repeated produces a pattern. Pattern requires repetition — in design as in life (a pattern of behavior). The more regular the repetition, the stronger the pattern will be. The most noticeable patterns occur when you see the group before the individuals — notice the organization first (the checker board). All of the motifs in a pattern have surfaces, so there is always texture. But there is not always pattern — only when you notice it. Texture and pattern are related. When you look closely at a tree you can see the pattern of leaves that make its surface. When you back away you lose awareness of the leaves and notice the texture the leaves make on the tree. Farther away still and you can see the pattern of the trees making up the forest and finally the texture of the forest. In this way pattern changes to texture as you lose sight of the individual motifs. This is easy to do with natural patterns, but you have to get quite far away from a checker board grid to see it as texture. Patterns are generally more noticeable than textures. This makes them a stronger visual element for controlling attention.

Iris Vase

How could you use tactile texture to enhance the composition? Visual texture?

If you switch to black and white, how different do the various textures look?

How can you use tactile associations to communicate with the viewer of your work? How many memories can you remember of touch such as warmth, softness, bristly etc.?

How do different types of fibers or fabrics affect your composition? Do different textures of fiber or fabric make you relate to the work in a different manner?

Can you create depth using a visually patterned felt? Motion? Focal point?

How can you depict different textures from your home environment?

What methods do you use that increase texture in your work? Can you think of other methods that would increase the tactile or visual textures in your work?

Posted in Design | 13 Comments