Back to some winter sheep

Back to some winter sheep

I have been felting and stitching a little picture again. And of course, my favourite sheep will make an appearance.

I did a sketch of the idea I wanted, I don’t think I have the patience for proper drawing. I do a quick general idea. I used a thick piece of “almost felt” and made the blue sky and snow base, wet felting them together. Next, I used Blue Faced Lester lock to make some evergreen trees.

 

I added some paths for the sheep. Sheep like to walk the same path other and over, one after the other, even in a green pasture. Once they are where they generally want to go, they wander off. I have no idea why they like to stand out in a snow covered field, but they do.

I added all my trees and tucked the edges around to make it neater. I added some blobs for the sheep so when I add the stitching they will stand out a little more. I also lightened up the paths a bit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used french knots to make the woolly coats and some embroidery for the heads and legs.

 

I fiddled with trees a bit and added trails into where the sheep are standing. I tried t add some shadow under the trees but it didn’t look right so I pulled it off. The trees still need some snow. I usually do that last, I am not sure why.

My problem is the bottom right. It seems very bare. I don’t know if I want another sheep or something else. I thought of some little birds on the snow but think as this is a small picture (about 5″x6″, 12×15 cm) they might end up looking like sheep droppings. I don’t want a fence. Does anyone have any ideas? It may end up being another sheep.

 

 

15 thoughts on “Back to some winter sheep

  1. It’s a lovely picture Ann and your sheep made with french knots are really sweet.

    Another sheep in the bottom right would look good – I had a laugh about why you didn’t put birds in!

    Excuse my ignorance, but what do sheep eat when the grass is under a lot of snow? If you give your sheep another foodstuff, could that be featured in the bottom right of the picture?

    1. Thanks Lyn. sheep droppings would be realistic. They do not eat anything out there. The snow is quite deep. They have hay in a feeder in the barn yard that they have free access too. I have no idea what is so great about standing or lying around in a snow covered field.

  2. I was thinking perhaps a sheep which had scraped the snow away to get at the grass. If you want a bird or two, how about a couple of pheasants, they’d be big enough to not look like droppings.
    I think the picture is really coming along and I love the effect of the french knots for fleeces.
    When you put the snow on the trees, how about a flash of red for a robin?
    Ann

    1. Thanks Ann, the snow is to deep for them to get to anything. they have hay at this time of year and they have a big bail in their feeder. they just stand or lay around. A sheep’s life is not an exiting one and that seems to be the way they like it, except for grain time then all bets are off on their peaceful and mild manners. yes some red spots for birds in a tree would work. Here they would be cardinals, our robins go south for the winter. Pheasants might work.

    1. Thanks Ruth, that s something to think about. I think that may be why I was thinking of the birds. Maybe a couple small rocks might work.

  3. Very cute picture and educational too – I didn’t know sheep like to hang out in the snow. You surely are the mistress of the French knot. I’m inclined to agree with Ruth that I think the space bottom right is just fine though you could place a couple of rock-type blobs there without committing to anything then take a photo and see what you think.

    1. Thanks Lindsay, I think the trick with french knots is after you wind tread around the needle poke it into the fabric and then pull it tight right against the fabric. I may try some rocks.

  4. Another nice sheep pic! As far as adding something I’d agree with Lyn. Perhaps another sheep or lamb.

Leave a Reply to Anonymous Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: