Some Different Nuno Felt Scarves

Here are a couple more scarves I made for the recent Winter fair. I think apart from the Burgundy/Pink/Orange/Yellow one I showed last week, they were all nuno-felt scarves. Both of these were made with 18.5 mic Merino and hand dyed cotton scrim. I embellished this first one with hand dyed bamboo top:

I don’t know if you remember the nuno scarf sample I made and showed a few weeks ago using irregular pieces of scrim, but I wanted to do a few variations of that. I first cut a strip of subtley variegated lemon/yellow scrim to size, then cut the strip into roughly even pieces and re-arranged them before adding the Merino on top:

That one used similarly sized pieces, but this next one used more irregular shapes. I didn’t want to make the overall shape of the scarf quite as irregular as the sample though, just more ‘uneven’. I got out lots of pieces of scrim in blues, greens and grey shades and ironed them-apparently those big plastic craft tables bend from heat more easily than I thought! I laid the pieces out on the template, and overlapped them in places for a bit more texture. Then I chose some 18.5 mic Merino in similar colours and matched the wool layout to the scrim.

It was interesting to just follow the colours of the scrim instead of planning the colour layout, it was a lot more random:

I really like the scrim side, it is so texturey and reminds me of lots of different landscapes:

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18 Responses to Some Different Nuno Felt Scarves

  1. Paula Mues Orts says:

    Hi. I love them. Were can I buy this kind of cotton?

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Paula πŸ™‚
      I bought mine on the roll from Whaleys in the UK, but lots of people sell smaller amounts on etsy.

  2. Kathryn Luciana says:

    very nice. I was going to ask a previous poster what micron of merino was used, but you gave me my answer. I’ve been using 22 micron. In the US I think we would look for cotton gauze perhaps? Not sure if we have scrim.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Kathryn πŸ™‚
      the cotton gauze we have in the UK is a bit more open weave than the scrim, and acts a little bit differently too, but is similar enough. I couldn’t say about US fabrics, I think they’re usually done by weight rather than thread count, and I’ve never weighed scrim per yard. Try Cheesecloth.com for lots of types of open weave cotton.

    • Marilyn aka Pandagirl says:

      Kathryn, here in the USA Dharma Trading sells scrim which is not as open weave as gauze. They don’t call it scrim anymore, but here is a link to their cotton gauzes. If I remember correctly you can order samples. Good luck.
      https://dharmatrading.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?query=Cotton+gauze

  3. Lyn says:

    The scrim side definitely has great texture, and as you say it does look landscapey. Love the colours!

  4. queenpushy says:

    Really beautiful scarves! Especially the blue one.

  5. Marilyn aka Pandagirl says:

    Using the scrim as a guide you got some really nice texture and colors in the scarves. Nice job.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Marilyn πŸ™‚
      It was quite ‘freeing’ not being careful where colours went or if they were ‘balanced’ etc.

  6. ruthlane says:

    Love them Zed, the blue one is really nice with the mix of blues and blue greens. Did you sell any scarves or has the winter fair not happened yet?

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Ruth πŸ™‚
      Nah, I had one person look at a scarf, but no sales. It was really cold and people had come well prepared with extra large scarves!

  7. I like the yellow one, I don’t usually like a lot of yellow but that is a really nice shade. Good idea to follow the scrim colours. It worked out really well

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Ann πŸ™‚
      Same here, I don’t normally like just one flat colour either, but I think the bamboo helped.

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