More Nuno and Resists

These are the last of my recent nuno felt pieces (I think!). I’ve shown small strips of these fabrics before on smaller pieces.  I showed the unusual scarf I used on this first one, a couple of months ago. I liked how the ample strips looked and the larger piece turned out really nice too:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI’ve no idea what the loose yellowy golden fibres are trapped between the layers, they do look a lot like soy top, here’s a closer look at the texture:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI used a piece of linen scarf on this next piece. I was surprised to see it say linen on the label, I thought it was viscose by the look of it. I showed a sample piece of this earlier this year too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere’s a close up:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd a super close up:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe’ve started playing with resists at the well-being centre recently. The first week, we used strips to make flaps/channels. This was the piece I made, it’s Merino with natural viscose fibre and dyed viscose fibre embellishments:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe played around with the pieces afterwards, shaping them to visualise other ways of using resists. This is mine in a tube/cylider shape:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe used a flat resist to make flat cases/pouches last week and next week we’re going to use flat reists for 3D felt.

This entry was posted in Wet Felting and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to More Nuno and Resists

  1. ruthlane says:

    Love the close up photos. And your resist piece in a tube looks like it would be a wonderful lamp shade.

  2. Leonor says:

    Those close-ups are lush! One of them reminds me of a flower 🙂 And I agree with Ruth, that tube would make a great lamp shade indeed.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Leonor 🙂
      I think they are meant to be flowers in an abstract kind of way.

  3. Lyn says:

    The tube stands on its own as a sculptural piece! The large piece of felt with the scarf (1st photo) has turned out really well Zed – I like the background colour you chose for it. The linen looks lovely close up.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Lyn 🙂
      I think we’ll be doing a few resist/sculptural pieces over the next few weeks, mostly because we’re running out of dyed Merino, but have lots of naturals!

  4. 1marylou says:

    Very nice informational photos. I’m inspired!

  5. Marilyn aka Pandagirl says:

    Wonderful textures on all the pieces. I agree the sculptural piece would make a great lamp.

  6. Great pieces, I really like the texture on the linen but like the a pattern on the second one. maybe you could take up a collection at the next meeting to get some more dyed fiber.

    • zedster66 says:

      Thanks, Ann 🙂
      Yeah we talked about having a whip-round. I’m going to look into applying for funding though. A small amount would go far, we’ve supported 3 groups on about £90 worth of supplies and donated wool/yarn/fibres 🙂

  7. Janice McKay says:

    Love your articles

  8. Pingback: Using Resists | feltingandfiberstudio

  9. I have a question about the linen at top. I thought you used green wool topped by a piece of floral linen. But looking close, no green wool shows through the flowers. So, how was it done? Can you help me e mystery!?

    • zedster66 says:

      Hi Kathryn,
      no you’re right, that’s just what I did. If you click on the yellowy flower, then click again for a closer zoom, you can just see the wool migration. I’ve only used linen this once as far as I know, but I’ve noticed from using cotton gauze, scrim, cheesecloth and muslin, that the looser the weave, the less the migration is visible, and this linen is similar to scrim, so not as visible as it might be on a tighter weave. I did try hard to match the wool to the linen colour too, though. This might be easier to see, I uploaded the full size file to flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/zedster01/27471825054/

  10. Kathryn Smith says:

    Thank you! I do see the green now! Seems counter intuitive that the looser the top weave, the less migration. Guess some tests are in order. I love whenever I see your name, I learn something!

We love comments and love to hear your opinions. Thanks for stopping by.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s