October Workshop Peg Doll Looms

October Workshop Peg Doll Looms

How did I ever manage to get anything done when I was working?

I have been working on importing and exporting File maker databases for the 2020 workshop and the guild library. I did 2 options for the workshop flyer for Elizabeth, our workshop coordinator, to choose from and will restart the workshop 2020 catalogue in the requested sort order after I have written my blog post. There was much fussing but with a bit of help I got the files exported in a format for the guild website and handed that part of the job off to the rest of the workshop team. <deep breath> I need to celebrate! Isn’t there a workshop coming up I really wanted to take when we were working on the catalogue last year? Yes! It was #1949 Peg Doll Loom Weaving with Mariann Hegedus as the instructor. Oh no! It’s about to run and we don’t have enough students! Quick, bug Elizabeth and Kelly and post it on the Facebook page! Yes, we now have enough students!

 

On Saturday I arrived early like usual and discovered a line of people blocking the door to go into the building! Oh, there is a huge fabric sale happening and they have leather hides and scraps!  Oh well, maybe I can make a quick run in at lunch. (i was able to get a bag of scraps of leather before the sale closed). now on to what i was actually there for.

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Mariann had brought the little Peg Doll looms in for show and tell and their cute shape piqued my interest. She had brought them back from a visit to Hungary. She said they were used to weave sleeves and had examples of dolls and puppets she had woven on them.

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She had a book with good pictures but unfortunately it’s in Hungarian. I did an online search to find more info but I mostly found Peg looms which are not like the peg doll looms. I did find 3 books; two of which might be the same (I don’t read Hungarian and I suspect  that one is the hardcover and one the paperback version?)  The book with the green cover is the one she showed us. Even not being able to read the language it was still educational to look at. There were a lot of more advanced techniques to try with this loom.

  6-8 szövés kereten szádfán karmantyúfán

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The concept we were working with was not too taxing in one way; how can you screw up under then over then under than over….(plain weave).  Let me tell you we found a lot of ways to mess that up! But the light bulb eventually went on for all of us.

This loom allows for plain weave, weft face or tapestry and all the two harness finger manipulations. I started to think about Butinay!!! Maybe the next work will have some!

If you sew the bottom (or top) end together you get a pouch. If you add a circular base of fabric or leather you get a cylinder that would be good to put a spindle or other small equipment in.

Warping is not too difficult. Keeping the tension snug and even is important. You wind your warp around the pegs up and down until you have gone around twice. (You can change colours as you go.) Each peg has 2 loops on it so that would be pairs of threads. The exception is the first peg, which needs to have 3 threads in one group.  This gives an odd number so you can create a continuous plan woven cloth as you weave.

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Now wind a butterfly and starting at the bottom weave every second thread.

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(This is a very old needle felted sheep I made years ago standing with the new loom and second weaving.)

I suspect I may have not interpreted the instructions as spoken.  When I took the weaving off I stated to loosen my first row of weaving! ( I thought about this and decided to modify the instructions for my second attempt. – third row I used a crochet hook between the loops and created a loop which I went through capturing the first and second row before going on to the next bit of weaving. Let that try to unravel!!)

 

I was admiring the bands of what looked like inkle banding in one of her samples. So I tried it. It looks complicated but it was achieved by alternating a gray row with a blue row, then compacting the weft to make it weft faced.

 

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One of my classmates finished her bag during the workshop I decided to purchase the loom (she had a couple more of the smaller ones available for sale) so I could make my bag taller in hopes of having it fit a spindle. As you can see, the top comes off the loom.

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Here is the second one that was completed. I gave a piece of the leather scraps I had purchased at the fabric sale (yes, I made it in time to buy a bag of leather scraps)

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I kept going, adding a fringe and switching to a long needle that is either an upholstery needle or a dollmaking needle (I’m not sure which) but now it is a peg doll loom needle. So I have plain weave and various stiffnesses of compacted weft face weaving. I also added a fringe. When I took off the weaving, the bottom (which suddenly became the top) started to unravel. I fixed that inappropriate behavior by a quick overhand blanket stich and then tightened up the plain weave so I could put a lacing cord through and use a edging stitch to stabilize the lower side of the lacing spaces. I think the purple cord will work better or I may make a blue and grey kumohimo band to use as a tie. I have decided on the grey leather to make a circular base .

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I had enough fun that I bought the loom and started a second project immediately. There has been a bit of chatting amongst a few of the guild members who are curious with this cute little loom and we have a few ideas on modifications to allow taller bags to be woven. I will let you know if anything develops from this curiosity.

Now I have to get back to the Guild catalogue and I accidentally seemed to have driven to Carleton Place winding up at the wool growers Co-op after visiting a Friend in Kempville. It was a wonderful visit and now I have a car that smells of wool and 4 more fleeces to wash before the snow flies, and more bulbs to plant and the guild Sale Ann is running to help with. Maybe it’s time for bed.  I have so much to do tomorrow!

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 The two coarse fleeces I took which are actually nice and soft.

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Some of the fleece that is coming in to be sorted

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Some of the fine grey and dark brown I didn’t buy but I did buy a light and medium grey!

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This is the rest of the Not-White fine bin. I will tell you more about this wonderful source of fiber another day right now it’s time to sleep.

 

About Jan

Realy im not 12, i am just sivearly dislexic. i can spin, weave, felt, garden, Draw, Paint, and do layout but i realy cant spell. if you read out louwd i do make more sence.
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12 Responses to October Workshop Peg Doll Looms

  1. annielynrosie says:

    Those circular looms are great! Lovely weaving produced on them. If the modifications work please show us.

    • Jan says:

      thankyou! i will certinaly keep you up to date. we were wanting to be ble to vary the hight to make a taller bag and posibly exchange the the peg part to get a bigger cercumference and more pegs. it was lots of fun. i started out with an open plane weave but after washing it was qwuite nice. the compacted weft face was not overstiff ether.

    • misfit27 says:

      I look forward to hearing more about the loom and the weaving.
      Karin

  2. misfit27 says:

    Is there anywhere to purchase the Peg Doll Loom?

    • Jan says:

      the only sites on line i found were in Hungarian so thay were not as inlightening to me as would have liked. (im still working at english so i dont think Hungarian is going to be an option) Mariann had a few of the smaller ones for sail but she can only bring a few back in a sute case each visit. she is here in Ottawa. a cuple of the wood turnners in the guild were expressing interest in looking at them so i will let you know if i can find a Canadian or US sorce.

  3. tesivaara says:

    What a great story about a type of loom I have never heard of! Fascinating and sounds like your group had a fun time learning to use it.

    • Jan says:

      thanks yes i hadnt herd or seen this type of loom untill Mariann brot one to the guild meeting for show and tell. it looked intreeging amd protable. i have some prity odd and obsure looms (a 3/4 hight icelandic varient warp wated loom which i have woven on. i also have a sprang frame that i havent figured out.) the workshop was a lot of fun and the quick brake to perchus a bag of leather scraps was fun too.

  4. ruthlane says:

    What an exciting day. The looms look like fun although I don’t have much experience with weaving.

    • Jan says:

      it was fun! it realy isnt too hard in overall concept how bad can under over under over be? ok there is a bit of a lurning curve but blame it on the loom being round and thus curved. it may be interesting to try and warp it up with wool and then needle felt over the warp!…. humm…..(aside to self: stupid brain, im bissy doing Layouts for the guild workshops why dont i come up with distracting ideas when i have some free time)

  5. Antje says:

    I’ve not heard of or seen this loom before, thank you for introducing us to it. I can imagine you had a lot of laughter in the group (& maybe a few choice words too) as fingers & threads weren’t coordinating!

  6. Jan says:

    it was amazing how fast the day past! there was a bit of muttering getting started but then lots of chatting as we got into the rhythm. there were ocational moments of colorful langwige as we discovered over and under was suddenly not were it should be. but it was lots of fun and i am already working on my second piece. switching from finger to a long needle has helped in the second weaving.

  7. I had never heard of the peg doll loom – so I find this very informative. I’m also fascinated with how it works. The entire post is awesome. Thank you for taking the time to share this! ❤️

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