Completed Wensleydale Lamp Shade

I finished the lamp shade this week. The process of putting the shade base together wasn’t to difficult. The directions wanted me to sew the fabric together, add a piece of Velcro and then cover the entire shade at once. But I wanted to show the organic edges of the felt. So I had to improvise a bit.

Frame Together and One Panel Added

Once I got the frame together, I wanted to apply each piece of felt so that at least a portion of the edges would show along the wooden frame. The four pieces of wood still on the floor are the pieces that go on the outside of the felt to hold it down.

Screw in Top of Frame

Those pieces of wood are held by a screw at the top and

Screw in Bottom of Frame

at the bottom. These screws fit into a corresponding hole in the outer frame piece.

Screws at Top of Felt Panel

So I decided to use those screws through the felt to hold the panels in place. I didn’t make a hole, I just worked the screw through the felt.

Bottom Corner of Felt Panel

And then I stretched the felt panel taut and put the bottom screw through to hold the bottom edge.

Adding More Panels and Holding with Blue Tape

I put a panel on opposite sides and then added the other two opposite sides. I used blue tape to hold the pieces in place and keep them tight while putting it all together.

Three Felt Panels in Place

Here is a top view with three felt panels in place.

Adding Top Wooden Piece to Hold Felt

Then I added the outer wooden pieces and screwed those down tight.

Tighten Down the Screw

I removed the blue tape as I went along.

Lampshade Covered

And here’s a top view with all the outer wooden pieces in place and tightened down.

With the Light On

And here it is on a lamp that is lit. It is a pretty big shade and would probably work best with a floor lamp.

Organic Edges

Here you can see how the organic edges show.

Texture of Shade

And here’s a texture shot of how the felt looks when the lamp is lit.

Without the Light On

And a final shot of how it looks with the light off. I don’t think I would go out and pay full price for this type of lamp shade frame but since I got it at the thrift store, it worked out well. I have another frame just like this one but I’m not sure I will do another one of these. I don’t have a lamp to put it on at the moment and I’m not sure it is well enough put together to sell it. But it’s finished!

 

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30 Responses to Completed Wensleydale Lamp Shade

  1. zedster66 says:

    That looks brilliant, Ruth! 🙂
    I thought you might be able to work it to leave the bottom edge natural, but it’s great you could leave all of them.

    • ruthlane says:

      Thanks Zed. Yes, it was nice to figure out a way to show all the edges. I’m not sure how well it will hold together over time but I guess we’ll see 🙂

  2. Lyn says:

    It looks pretty both unlit and lit, and I like the organic edges showing! It’ll let plenty of light through too.

    One way to buy a large frame cheaply (floor standing lamp) is to check the charity shops/boot sales for the most hideous fabric shade you can find and it’ll be yours for pennies because the owner will be glad to be rid of it. But once the fabric is removed you’ll have a lovely wire frame! A quick re-tape and you’re off. (Annie once recovered such a shade – 8 cobweb panels joined so that every organic edge showed.)

    • ruthlane says:

      Thanks Lyn – I’m not sure that this frame was actually a good idea. I think a regular frame like you are talking about would work better. I don’t really like the shape all that much and I’d prefer the wood not to show at all but live and learn!

  3. A lot of work, but a very unique lamp shade for sure. Would look good in a log home with wood furniture.

    • ruthlane says:

      Thanks Judy – I also thought log home when I finished it. I was thinking of selling it but I’m afraid it might not hold up very well to any abuse.

  4. zararooke says:

    Well I love it and I think we need a new lamp in our livingroom… 😉 I haven’t got a suitable frame, but will have a look at charity shops to see if I can find a big wire frame (as Lyn suggested), or perhaps try to construct one myself from wire. I am imagining something with locks hanging down from the bottom edge. Thanks for the inspiration! 🙂

  5. Teri Berry says:

    It looks great Ruth, I particularly like it with the light on so you can see all the lovely curls. For those looking for old lampshades, freecycle is a great place to ask, they are invariably free and people love to know that their junk is being upcycled.

  6. luvswool says:

    Your lampshade looks terrific! The wood contrasts nicely with the organic look of the Wensleydale. I think this is a winner!

  7. kwinter12 says:

    Woohoo – well done! The texture with the light shining through is fabulous!

  8. Marilyn aka Pandagirl says:

    It turned out great Ruth. I love it lit and unlit. Such wonderful texture! Well done!

  9. Nada says:

    That must have been a lot of work but with light on it looks very nice

  10. I love the way the curls show up with the light on. I would have to say though it is not beautiful until you turn on the light. I wonder if painting the wood bits a better colour would help it. Maybe the same colour as the wool so they do not standout so much.

  11. Leonor says:

    It’s so pretty, Ruth! Well done. I hope you do make a new one, you definitely have the knack for it 🙂

  12. love how the light shines through, beautiful

  13. Judy says:

    Hello Ruth. Absolutely lovely. The size is perfect. Excellent project.

  14. I like the organic look of it and the texture when it it lit. Fun!

  15. inge monticello says:

    Thank you! This was another fun and informative read into the fascinating world of fiber and wet felting. I believe that your use of Wensleydale for this purpose was brilliant!

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