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Samples from the Nuno Paper Lamination Class

Samples from the Nuno Paper Lamination Class

I just finished Ruth Lane’s online class.  Since I am also papermaker, I was excited to combine the two passions and see the results.

It was a fun experiment using a variety of papers, dyes, paints and fabrics.  Some worked, some didn’t, but that’s how we learn.

This first one is a paper napkin from one of my Grandson’s birthday party earlier this year on organza.  Since I was experimenting, I used some batts with unknown fibers in two colors, blue and green.

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I decided not to further embellish it since the “characters” were nicely defined.  I suppose I could add some greenery and clouds.  But I wanted to show the results this far.

The next one is also “finished.”  I used a tree stencil on organza with unryu paper which is very fibery.  Again it is on a batt of unknown fiber.

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I embellished around the stencil with silver silk hankies.  It felted very nicely.

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Since these were experiments, I wasn’t concerned about perfect edges and left them organic.

Here’s a closeup of the center.  You can see how those fiber areas look like branches and connect the trees.

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I got great texture as you can see from this side view.

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The one project I completed was a stenciled bird pic.

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I used a couple of paper and fabric types with this stencil, but chose this one to finish even though the colors faded.  It was a dyed paper towel on cotton voile.  You can’t see it in the pics, but the bumps from the towel can be seen in spots. I used it on a merino batt.

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I forgot to cover the edges of the voile, so I used machine stitching to cover the edges.

I decided to hand stitch the rest. There is a lot of dimension in the paper, although it’s not too obvious in these pics.

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I wanted to keep it simple.  I used double rayon thread with threaded backstitches and some satin stitches to embellish it. The green is a variegated thread. I purposely just outlined because I wanted the birds to be the center of attention. Forgive my poor stitching. Here are some closeups.

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Now I have to decide whether to frame it or leave it organic.

Thanks Ruth!  It was a unique class. I need more practice. I’m still working on the final projects.

Dyeing with Avocado Skins Part 2

Dyeing with Avocado Skins Part 2

My next step was to use the avocado skins for dyeing.  Again, the instructions varied.  Some said to tear the skins, others use whole.  I went with using the whole skins.

I used approximately the same amount of wool, thick and thin yarn, silk habatoi, silk gauze and cotton voile.  What I did differently this time was to put everything in before it was heated.  I felt this would save some time waiting to put in the wool after cooling. I’m not sure this changed the outcome.

I let the pot come to a boil,  left it to simmer for almost an hour.  Then let it sit overnight to cool.

The results were interesting and different from the pits.  The color was like a latte for the wool and silk.  The cotton was a very pale pink.

20160123_114840 20160123_115531 20160124_115819 But I couldn’t stop there.  I had saved the dye pot from  the pits and used half and half with the skins and pits.  I also presoaked the wool, silk and cotton in an alum mordant for several hours.

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Again, I added the fabrics and wool before heating, heated to boiling then simmered for almost an hour and left it all sit overnight.  I wondered if the colors would be brighter and more intense with the addition of the alum.

Here are the results:

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The result a little more coppery except for the cotton.

Now here they are next to each other.  From left to right – pits, skins, pits and skins with alum.

20160125_113312I thought it was interesting that the silk gauze was the deepest color in the mixed batch.

They are all lovely colors. Now to figure what to do with them.  And yes, I’ll continue to save my avocados.

Dyeing with Avocado Pits Part 1

Dyeing with Avocado Pits Part 1

I don’t know where I ran across the blog on dyeing with avocado, but I eat a good amount of it and always feel guilty throwing it out.  My Son Brad and his wife Mari compost, but we don’t maintain a big enough garden to justify a compost heap.   So, when I read the blog and did some further research, I started freezing the pits and skins.

When I had about ten or eleven of them, I started my dyeing project.  There were several posts on how to dye with the pits.  One said to use the whole pit, another said to cut them.  I had started cutting them so I went with that.

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I prepared some merino (76 gm, thick and thin yarn 4-8 gm, silk habatoi -1/4 yard, silk gauze 1/4 yd and cotton voile 1/8 yd) by washing with synthropol and rinsing then soaking.

I put the pits in about 2 gallons of water and brought it to a boil, added the fabrics, then simmered for an hour. I let it cool down then added the wool and let it sit overnight.

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Here is what the liquid looked like.

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After rinsing and letting it dry, here were the results:

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20160122_110547 20160122_110538 The silks were a pinkish coppery color and the wools a lighter version.  The cotton voile was a brighter pink.

Have you ever tried this?

Next up is the avocado skins.  Stay tuned until next week…

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