Influencing Shape with Prefelt Part 2

I finally got around to trying a different shaped pod using prefelt to influence the shape. My first post creating a seed pod is here. I created this pod in the same way but started with a different shape and cut the prefelt differently. I decided to use a bit brighter color for the inside layer.

I used the same green batt that I had used on my last pod but used a tear drop shaped resist. I covered the resist and felted until it was holding together to make a prefelt.

I then cut a little cap off the top and a diagonal type cut all the way down to the end. The photo on the left shows the “front” side and the photo on the right is the “back” side.

I then took the green prefelt off the resist and covered it with orange wool and wet the orange wool down. Then I put the green prefelt back over top of the orange wool. I wrapped the orange wool around the resist from side to side. Next time, I think I would wrap it from end to end to get a more defined shrinkage but it worked this way too. The orange layer is fairly thin compared to the thicker green prefelt.

I then began felting the two together. I carefully rubbed along all the green edges and worked on getting the edges to stick down to the orange underneath. Once everything was holding together, I removed the resist. Then I fulled the piece and rubbed along the orange lines to get the resulting shape. I fulled it very hard so it would hold its shape easily.

And here’s the result. It does look very much like a seashell but also could be a chili pod or some other sort of veggie pod. These are really fun to make, have you tried this technique yet? Please show us your results over on the forum.

 

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13 Responses to Influencing Shape with Prefelt Part 2

  1. annielynrosie says:

    It’s definitely a seashell … or maybe it’s a cream horn (who else remembers those?)
    Clear explanation Ruth and lovely result!

  2. ruthlane says:

    Thanks! I remember cream horns but green would definitely be the wrong color for cream horns. 🙂

  3. Carol Tummon says:

    That is really nice and clear and it is something I will try eventually. Thanks for showing your process. I also remember cream horns but you’re right would not be a colour you’d like in your cream horn.

  4. Karen Lane says:

    Wow, this great Ruth! I’ve been trying to make a seashell recently and failed miserably….this is just the tutorial I needed so thank you so much for sharing, you got a great result!

  5. Awesome! I remember cream shells, this would be a moldy one. But I think this one makes a great shell. Thanks for sharing your process.

  6. Antje says:

    Great use of prefelt to get the differential shrinkage & well explained Ruth. If you wrapped the orange wool end to end wouldn’t your shrinkage create more of a shortened shell/horn, but slightly wider?

    If anyone, like me, enjoyed this explanation take a peek at Brigitte Funk’s work – (www.parallelfunk.de) she makes lots of fun whimsical creatures.

    Mmmm, cream horns – I remember those. I’ll just put green cream horns in with the blue bananas category and say it is mind over matter!

    • ruthlane says:

      Thanks Antje, yes, it would shorten the pod but I think the indented parts would be accentuated too.

      Blue bananas and green cream horns must be from a parallel universe. 😉

  7. Flextiles says:

    So much potential with this technique Ruth – very interesting to see what you can achieve with different shapes of prefelt.

    I think I’ll steer clear of the discussion on cream horns! 😉

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